New top story from Time: How to Watch the 2019 U.S. Open for Free

One of the biggest events in tennis is here. It’s almost time to crown the 2019 U.S. Open winners.

The 2019 U.S. Open, which takes place at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York, will air on ESPN this year. The competition began with the Qualifying Tournament on Aug. 19 and ends with the women’s and men’s singles finals on Sept. 7 and Sept. 8, respectively.

At the 2018 tournament, Naomi Osaka defeated Serena Williams to earn the women’s singles title — making her the first woman from Japan to earn a Grand Slam singles title. Most recently, though, Williams lost to Simona Halep of Romania at the 2019 Wimbledon singles final in July (who had also ousted 15-year-old Cori “Coco” Gauff from the tournament).

After Gaufff impressed the world of tennis and beyond as the youngest person to qualify for a Wimbledon Grand Slam match, beating Venus Williams, a five-time Wimbledon winner, she’s certainly one to watch.

Novak Djokovic of Serbia won the 2018 men’s single’s final in his third U.S. Open win. Now, after his win at Wimbledon last month, Djokovic is poised to win his 17th Grand Slam title — if he can defeat his biggest competitors, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, at this year’s U.S. Open. Federer currently has the all-time highest men’s Grand Slam title record with 20, and Nadal is close behind with 18.

First held in 1881, the U.S. Open is one of the four major tennis tournaments that make up the annual Grand Slam titles, along with the Australian Open, French Open and Wimbledon.

Here’s how to watch the 2019 U.S. Open — on TV or for free.

How can I watch the U.S. Open 2019 for free online?

Tim Clayton—Corbis/Getty ImagesNovak Djokovic of Serbia celebrates his victory against Juan Martin Del Potro of Argentina in the Men’s Singles Final on Arthur Ashe Stadium at the 2018 U.S. Open Tennis Tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 9, 2018 in Flushing, Queens, New York City.

Hulu Live

With a Hulu Live account, U.S. Open fans can catch all matches on ESPN from any computer and most smart TVs. For Hulu Live, you need a subscription to regular Hulu and the Live TV add-on. That plan costs $44.99 per month, but you can get the first week free. So, if you want to watch a particular match for free, make sure you sign up for Hulu Live at the right time.

Sling TV

With a Sling TV account, you can stream ESPN’s live broadcasts of every U.S. Open match. While the online live TV subscription service is not free, Sling TV offers a 40 percent discount for new users in the first month. (Sling TV users with the “Sling Orange” package can view ESPN and ESPN2.)

How can I watch the U.S. Open with cable?

Mohammed Elshamy—Anadolu Agency/Getty ImagesSerena Williams of USA competes against Naomi Osaka (not seen) of Japan during US Open 2018 women’s final match on September 8, 2018 in New York, United States.

U.S. Open matches will be broadcast exclusively on ESPN and ESPN2 this year for American viewers. The ESPN app will also feature live streams of this year’s matches.

With your cable provider login, you can watch ESPN live on the network’s website.

The Tennis Channel will be airing “preview and highlight shows, as well as extensive match encore programming,” according to the U.S. Open’s TV schedule.

When are the can’t-miss matches?

Tim Clayton – Corbis/Getty ImagesRafael Nadal of Spain in action against Juan Martin Del Potro of Argentina in last year’s Men’s Singles Semi Final match on Arthur Ashe Stadium at the 2018 US Open Tennis Tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 7th, 2018 in Flushing, Queens, New York City.

Qualifying Tournament: Monday, Aug. 19 – Friday, Aug. 23

The first round of the 2019 U.S. Open is the Qualifying Tournament, which began on Aug. 19 at 11 a.m. E.T. Qualifying rounds continued until the final on Friday, Aug. 23, when the winning men and women advanced to the main draw of the tournament.

In total, from the first day, 128 men and 128 women will compete for a chance at advancing to the next round.

Men’s Doubles Final: The men’s doubles final match is on Friday, Sept. 6 at 12 p.m. E.T.

Mixed Doubles Final: The mixed doubles final, with one man and one woman per team, will be on Saturday, Sept. 7 at 12 p.m. E.T.

Women’s Doubles Final: Sunday, Sept. 8 at 1 p.m. E.T. is the women’s doubles final match.

Women’s Singles Semifinals: The women’s singles semifinals are Friday, Sept. 6 at 4 p.m. E.T. This match will decide the two who will match up in the U.S. Open finals.

Men’s Singles Semifinals: Friday, Sept. 6 at 4 p.m. is the men’s singles semifinals, determining who will hit the court for that Sunday’s final match.

When are the men and women’s singles finals?

Chris Trotman—Getty Images for USTANaomi Osaka of Japan celebrates with the championship trophy after winning the Women’s Singles finals match against Serena Williams of the United States on Day Thirteen of the 2018 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.

The women’s singles final match takes place on Saturday, Sept. 7 at 4 p.m. E.T. The men’s singles final is the next day, Sunday, Sept. 8, also at 4 p.m. E.T.

Advertisements

New top story from Time: How to Watch the 2019 U.S. Open for Free

One of the biggest events in tennis is here. It’s almost time to crown the 2019 U.S. Open winners.

The 2019 U.S. Open, which takes place at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York, will air on ESPN this year. The competition began with the Qualifying Tournament on Aug. 19 and ends with the women’s and men’s singles finals on Sept. 7 and Sept. 8, respectively.

At the 2018 tournament, Naomi Osaka defeated Serena Williams to earn the women’s singles title — making her the first woman from Japan to earn a Grand Slam singles title. Most recently, though, Williams lost to Simona Halep of Romania at the 2019 Wimbledon singles final in July (who had also ousted 15-year-old Cori “Coco” Gauff from the tournament).

After Gaufff impressed the world of tennis and beyond as the youngest person to qualify for a Wimbledon Grand Slam match, beating Venus Williams, a five-time Wimbledon winner, she’s certainly one to watch.

Novak Djokovic of Serbia won the 2018 men’s single’s final in his third U.S. Open win. Now, after his win at Wimbledon last month, Djokovic is poised to win his 17th Grand Slam title — if he can defeat his biggest competitors, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, at this year’s U.S. Open. Federer currently has the all-time highest men’s Grand Slam title record with 20, and Nadal is close behind with 18.

First held in 1881, the U.S. Open is one of the four major tennis tournaments that make up the annual Grand Slam titles, along with the Australian Open, French Open and Wimbledon.

Here’s how to watch the 2019 U.S. Open — on TV or for free.

How can I watch the U.S. Open 2019 for free online?

Tim Clayton—Corbis/Getty ImagesNovak Djokovic of Serbia celebrates his victory against Juan Martin Del Potro of Argentina in the Men’s Singles Final on Arthur Ashe Stadium at the 2018 U.S. Open Tennis Tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 9, 2018 in Flushing, Queens, New York City.

Hulu Live

With a Hulu Live account, U.S. Open fans can catch all matches on ESPN from any computer and most smart TVs. For Hulu Live, you need a subscription to regular Hulu and the Live TV add-on. That plan costs $44.99 per month, but you can get the first week free. So, if you want to watch a particular match for free, make sure you sign up for Hulu Live at the right time.

Sling TV

With a Sling TV account, you can stream ESPN’s live broadcasts of every U.S. Open match. While the online live TV subscription service is not free, Sling TV offers a 40 percent discount for new users in the first month. (Sling TV users with the “Sling Orange” package can view ESPN and ESPN2.)

How can I watch the U.S. Open with cable?

Mohammed Elshamy—Anadolu Agency/Getty ImagesSerena Williams of USA competes against Naomi Osaka (not seen) of Japan during US Open 2018 women’s final match on September 8, 2018 in New York, United States.

U.S. Open matches will be broadcast exclusively on ESPN and ESPN2 this year for American viewers. The ESPN app will also feature live streams of this year’s matches.

With your cable provider login, you can watch ESPN live on the network’s website.

The Tennis Channel will be airing “preview and highlight shows, as well as extensive match encore programming,” according to the U.S. Open’s TV schedule.

When are the can’t-miss matches?

Tim Clayton – Corbis/Getty ImagesRafael Nadal of Spain in action against Juan Martin Del Potro of Argentina in last year’s Men’s Singles Semi Final match on Arthur Ashe Stadium at the 2018 US Open Tennis Tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 7th, 2018 in Flushing, Queens, New York City.

Qualifying Tournament: Monday, Aug. 19 – Friday, Aug. 23

The first round of the 2019 U.S. Open is the Qualifying Tournament, which began on Aug. 19 at 11 a.m. E.T. Qualifying rounds continued until the final on Friday, Aug. 23, when the winning men and women advanced to the main draw of the tournament.

In total, from the first day, 128 men and 128 women will compete for a chance at advancing to the next round.

Men’s Doubles Final: The men’s doubles final match is on Friday, Sept. 6 at 12 p.m. E.T.

Mixed Doubles Final: The mixed doubles final, with one man and one woman per team, will be on Saturday, Sept. 7 at 12 p.m. E.T.

Women’s Doubles Final: Sunday, Sept. 8 at 1 p.m. E.T. is the women’s doubles final match.

Women’s Singles Semifinals: The women’s singles semifinals are Friday, Sept. 6 at 4 p.m. E.T. This match will decide the two who will match up in the U.S. Open finals.

Men’s Singles Semifinals: Friday, Sept. 6 at 4 p.m. is the men’s singles semifinals, determining who will hit the court for that Sunday’s final match.

When are the men and women’s singles finals?

Chris Trotman—Getty Images for USTANaomi Osaka of Japan celebrates with the championship trophy after winning the Women’s Singles finals match against Serena Williams of the United States on Day Thirteen of the 2018 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.

The women’s singles final match takes place on Saturday, Sept. 7 at 4 p.m. E.T. The men’s singles final is the next day, Sunday, Sept. 8, also at 4 p.m. E.T.

New world news from Time: ‘Search For & Refuse All Deliveries.’ Amid Trade War, Trump Urges USPS Crackdown on Fentanyl Trafficking From China

With tensions over trade with China escalating, President Donald Trump said on Friday that he is “ordering” the U.S. postal service and express shipping companies to “SEARCH FOR & REFUSE all deliveries of fentanyl,” a deadly synthetic opioid. American officials have long blamed China for the influx of fentanyl and related drugs reaching U.S. borders — sent directly and trafficked via other countries — while federal efforts to limit (if not stop outright) their import have long been underway.

 

Fentanyl is 50 times stronger than heroin, and proving increasingly popular with American drug users. While the rate of overdose deaths from heroin has plateaued in recent years, the rate of overdose deaths related to synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, has been increasing — by 45 percent between 2016 and 2017 (from 6.2 to 9 deaths per 100,000 people). About 28,400 people died from overdoses involving synthetic opioids in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As part of a wide-ranging deal between Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping last December, China had reportedly pledged to designate fentanyl and similar drugs as controlled substances, subjecting those who sell them to harsh punishments and potentially slowing their flow into the U.S. Trump said Jinping had told him that China did not have a drug problem, because it could (and does) use the death penalty to punish drug dealers.

Trump has since argued that China has not held up its end of the bargain. On Friday, China’s narcotics regulator said the U.S. is politicizing the issue of Chinese fentanyl exports and “up-ending the facts for their own political necessities,” Bloomberg reported.

What are authorities doing to deal with drugs shipped by mail?

Congress and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the main federal agency dealing with preventing contraband from entering the country, have been working to crack down on drug trafficking through the mail for years. But it hasn’t been easy.

A nearly yearlong bipartisan Congressional investigation, as detailed in a January 2018 report from Sens. Tom Carper (D-DE) and Rob Portman (R-OH), found that Chinese fentanyl sellers “operate openly on the Internet.” These sellers’ “preferred method of shipping is the U.S. Postal Service because the risk of seizure by Customs & Border Protection (CPB) is small and delivery is basically guaranteed.” The investigation discovered hundreds of online drug transactions and linked online sellers in China to seven synthetic opioid-related deaths in the U.S.

Part of the STOP (Synthetics Trafficking and Overdose Prevention) Act, legislation passed in 2018 to help combat the opioid crisis in the United States, mandates that the USPS collects information on all mail sent from China, including details on the sender and the package’s contents.

A USPS spokesperson said in an emailed statement that the agency is “aggressively working” towards keeping dangerous drugs from entering the U.S. from China and other countries. Per the CBP’s website, international mail is screened thusly:

Mail entering the United States from abroad first arrives at a United States Postal Service (USPS) Sorting Facility. The Postal Service then sends packages to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for examination and to assess duties and taxes, if any is owed. CBP processing is required for civilian parcels as well as those sent from overseas military postal facilities (APO/FPO). If CBP re-sealed a package due to examination, colored tape with the words “Examined by CBP” would be used.

Despite a recruiting crisis and agents being reassigned to the border — limiting resources needed to deal with identifying contraband at mail processing centers across the U.S. — CBP has said it is “committed to dedicating its resources to thwart illicit opioid supply chains and networks” and that “an effort is underway” to use advanced technologies such as pollen analysis to help detect fentanyl more efficiently.

How effective can mail inspections ever be?

The amount of fentanyl seized by CBP has been steadily increasing over the last few years: the agency seized almost 34 pounds from 50 incidents in the 2016 fiscal year, 96 pounds from 221 incidents in 2017 and more than 136 pounds from 455 incidents in 2018. But the agency appears to be straining under the sheer volume of mail the U.S. receives.

In 2017, Robert Perez, then an acting executive assistant commissioner at CBP, testified before Congress that, in the absence of advanced data to help target suspicious packages, officers were required to sort through large bags or bins of parcels manually. (Perez is now listed as deputy commissioner for the agency on their website.) “This manual process, again coupled with the tremendous volume of inbound mail to the United States, creates a daunting task for CBP,” Perez’s written testimony stated.

The 2018 Congressional investigation said that CPB’s manual efforts to inspect packages was “inefficient and the equivalent to finding a needle in a haystack.”

Lawmakers also noted in another 2018 congressional report about combatting the opioid epidemic that “few international mail packages are physically inspected by CBP” and on average, port officers employed by the CBP “only inspect 100 of the 1.3 million inbound international packages that USPS handles per day.”

In a statement to the Wall Street Journal following Trump’s tweets on Friday, a FedEx spokesperson said that “FedEx already has extensive security measures in place to prevent the use of our networks for illegal purposes… we follow the laws and regulations everywhere we do business and have a long history of close cooperation with authorities.”

Also via the WSJ, from a UPS spokesperson: “UPS takes a multilayered approach to security and compliance to identify and prevent delivery of illegal fentanyl and other illicit substances.”

Is it enough to go after the supply network?

“It’s critical that we work more closely with China, the main source for drugs like fentanyl that enter our country, to demand that they cut off the drug supply, while we work at home to stem demand,” Sen. Carper said during Congress’ investigation.

Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University and an expert on opioids, says it’s the latter strategy that will make a difference. Trump’s remarks are a “knee-jerk statement,” Beletsky tells TIME, adding that it’s a “laughable proposition that we could stop the majority or even a major portion of contraband [even if] we triple the number of inspectors looking for the mail and delayed mail by multiple days.”

Trump’s statement is a reflection of U.S. drug policy more broadly, Beletsky notes — with a focus more on dismantling drug trafficking networks than helping vulnerable Americans struggling with substance abuse. Even if it were possible to do what Trump is proposing, it would not put a dent in fentanyl-related deaths, Beletsky says. He argues that the government should instead be directing money and resources into initiatives like expanding Medicaid, or prevention and rehabilitation programs which could work to make people less likely to become dependent on drugs in the first place.

“We’re much better served in trying to address demand for those substances and not turning to constantly play a cat-and-mouse game,” Beletsky says. “The evolution of fentanyl has been driven by efforts to crack down on the supply of heroin [and] encourages drug trafficking organizations to create ever more compact and less detectable drugs.”

The Trump administration has said it has made it curtailing opioid abuse a priority, including by reducing the over-prescription of opioids and increasing funding for opioid and pain research from $600 million to $1.1 billion.

New top story from Time: ‘Search For & Refuse All Deliveries.’ Amid Trade War, Trump Urges USPS Crackdown on Fentanyl Trafficking From China

With tensions over trade with China escalating, President Donald Trump said on Friday that he is “ordering” the U.S. postal service and express shipping companies to “SEARCH FOR & REFUSE all deliveries of fentanyl,” a deadly synthetic opioid. American officials have long blamed China for the influx of fentanyl and related drugs reaching U.S. borders — sent directly and trafficked via other countries — while federal efforts to limit (if not stop outright) their import have long been underway.

 

Fentanyl is 50 times stronger than heroin, and proving increasingly popular with American drug users. While the rate of overdose deaths from heroin has plateaued in recent years, the rate of overdose deaths related to synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, has been increasing — by 45 percent between 2016 and 2017 (from 6.2 to 9 deaths per 100,000 people). About 28,400 people died from overdoses involving synthetic opioids in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As part of a wide-ranging deal between Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping last December, China had reportedly pledged to designate fentanyl and similar drugs as controlled substances, subjecting those who sell them to harsh punishments and potentially slowing their flow into the U.S. Trump said Jinping had told him that China did not have a drug problem, because it could (and does) use the death penalty to punish drug dealers.

Trump has since argued that China has not held up its end of the bargain. On Friday, China’s narcotics regulator said the U.S. is politicizing the issue of Chinese fentanyl exports and “up-ending the facts for their own political necessities,” Bloomberg reported.

What are authorities doing to deal with drugs shipped by mail?

Congress and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the main federal agency dealing with preventing contraband from entering the country, have been working to crack down on drug trafficking through the mail for years. But it hasn’t been easy.

A nearly yearlong bipartisan Congressional investigation, as detailed in a January 2018 report from Sens. Tom Carper (D-DE) and Rob Portman (R-OH), found that Chinese fentanyl sellers “operate openly on the Internet.” These sellers’ “preferred method of shipping is the U.S. Postal Service because the risk of seizure by Customs & Border Protection (CPB) is small and delivery is basically guaranteed.” The investigation discovered hundreds of online drug transactions and linked online sellers in China to seven synthetic opioid-related deaths in the U.S.

Part of the STOP (Synthetics Trafficking and Overdose Prevention) Act, legislation passed in 2018 to help combat the opioid crisis in the United States, mandates that the USPS collects information on all mail sent from China, including details on the sender and the package’s contents.

A USPS spokesperson said in an emailed statement that the agency is “aggressively working” towards keeping dangerous drugs from entering the U.S. from China and other countries. Per the CBP’s website, international mail is screened thusly:

Mail entering the United States from abroad first arrives at a United States Postal Service (USPS) Sorting Facility. The Postal Service then sends packages to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for examination and to assess duties and taxes, if any is owed. CBP processing is required for civilian parcels as well as those sent from overseas military postal facilities (APO/FPO). If CBP re-sealed a package due to examination, colored tape with the words “Examined by CBP” would be used.

Despite a recruiting crisis and agents being reassigned to the border — limiting resources needed to deal with identifying contraband at mail processing centers across the U.S. — CBP has said it is “committed to dedicating its resources to thwart illicit opioid supply chains and networks” and that “an effort is underway” to use advanced technologies such as pollen analysis to help detect fentanyl more efficiently.

How effective can mail inspections ever be?

The amount of fentanyl seized by CBP has been steadily increasing over the last few years: the agency seized almost 34 pounds from 50 incidents in the 2016 fiscal year, 96 pounds from 221 incidents in 2017 and more than 136 pounds from 455 incidents in 2018. But the agency appears to be straining under the sheer volume of mail the U.S. receives.

In 2017, Robert Perez, then an acting executive assistant commissioner at CBP, testified before Congress that, in the absence of advanced data to help target suspicious packages, officers were required to sort through large bags or bins of parcels manually. (Perez is now listed as deputy commissioner for the agency on their website.) “This manual process, again coupled with the tremendous volume of inbound mail to the United States, creates a daunting task for CBP,” Perez’s written testimony stated.

The 2018 Congressional investigation said that CPB’s manual efforts to inspect packages was “inefficient and the equivalent to finding a needle in a haystack.”

Lawmakers also noted in another 2018 congressional report about combatting the opioid epidemic that “few international mail packages are physically inspected by CBP” and on average, port officers employed by the CBP “only inspect 100 of the 1.3 million inbound international packages that USPS handles per day.”

In a statement to the Wall Street Journal following Trump’s tweets on Friday, a FedEx spokesperson said that “FedEx already has extensive security measures in place to prevent the use of our networks for illegal purposes… we follow the laws and regulations everywhere we do business and have a long history of close cooperation with authorities.”

Also via the WSJ, from a UPS spokesperson: “UPS takes a multilayered approach to security and compliance to identify and prevent delivery of illegal fentanyl and other illicit substances.”

Is it enough to go after the supply network?

“It’s critical that we work more closely with China, the main source for drugs like fentanyl that enter our country, to demand that they cut off the drug supply, while we work at home to stem demand,” Sen. Carper said during Congress’ investigation.

Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University and an expert on opioids, says it’s the latter strategy that will make a difference. Trump’s remarks are a “knee-jerk statement,” Beletsky tells TIME, adding that it’s a “laughable proposition that we could stop the majority or even a major portion of contraband [even if] we triple the number of inspectors looking for the mail and delayed mail by multiple days.”

Trump’s statement is a reflection of U.S. drug policy more broadly, Beletsky notes — with a focus more on dismantling drug trafficking networks than helping vulnerable Americans struggling with substance abuse. Even if it were possible to do what Trump is proposing, it would not put a dent in fentanyl-related deaths, Beletsky says. He argues that the government should instead be directing money and resources into initiatives like expanding Medicaid, or prevention and rehabilitation programs which could work to make people less likely to become dependent on drugs in the first place.

“We’re much better served in trying to address demand for those substances and not turning to constantly play a cat-and-mouse game,” Beletsky says. “The evolution of fentanyl has been driven by efforts to crack down on the supply of heroin [and] encourages drug trafficking organizations to create ever more compact and less detectable drugs.”

The Trump administration has said it has made it curtailing opioid abuse a priority, including by reducing the over-prescription of opioids and increasing funding for opioid and pain research from $600 million to $1.1 billion.

New story in Politics from Time: ‘Search For & Refuse All Deliveries.’ Amid Trade War, Trump Urges USPS Crackdown on Fentanyl Trafficking From China

With tensions over trade with China escalating, President Donald Trump said on Friday that he is “ordering” the U.S. postal service and express shipping companies to “SEARCH FOR & REFUSE all deliveries of fentanyl,” a deadly synthetic opioid. American officials have long blamed China for the influx of fentanyl and related drugs reaching U.S. borders — sent directly and trafficked via other countries — while federal efforts to limit (if not stop outright) their import have long been underway.

 

Fentanyl is 50 times stronger than heroin, and proving increasingly popular with American drug users. While the rate of overdose deaths from heroin has plateaued in recent years, the rate of overdose deaths related to synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, has been increasing — by 45 percent between 2016 and 2017 (from 6.2 to 9 deaths per 100,000 people). About 28,400 people died from overdoses involving synthetic opioids in 2017, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As part of a wide-ranging deal between Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping last December, China had reportedly pledged to designate fentanyl and similar drugs as controlled substances, subjecting those who sell them to harsh punishments and potentially slowing their flow into the U.S. Trump said Jinping had told him that China did not have a drug problem, because it could (and does) use the death penalty to punish drug dealers.

Trump has since argued that China has not held up its end of the bargain. On Friday, China’s narcotics regulator said the U.S. is politicizing the issue of Chinese fentanyl exports and “up-ending the facts for their own political necessities,” Bloomberg reported.

What are authorities doing to deal with drugs shipped by mail?

Congress and U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the main federal agency dealing with preventing contraband from entering the country, have been working to crack down on drug trafficking through the mail for years. But it hasn’t been easy.

A nearly yearlong bipartisan Congressional investigation, as detailed in a January 2018 report from Sens. Tom Carper (D-DE) and Rob Portman (R-OH), found that Chinese fentanyl sellers “operate openly on the Internet.” These sellers’ “preferred method of shipping is the U.S. Postal Service because the risk of seizure by Customs & Border Protection (CPB) is small and delivery is basically guaranteed.” The investigation discovered hundreds of online drug transactions and linked online sellers in China to seven synthetic opioid-related deaths in the U.S.

Part of the STOP (Synthetics Trafficking and Overdose Prevention) Act, legislation passed in 2018 to help combat the opioid crisis in the United States, mandates that the USPS collects information on all mail sent from China, including details on the sender and the package’s contents.

A USPS spokesperson said in an emailed statement that the agency is “aggressively working” towards keeping dangerous drugs from entering the U.S. from China and other countries. Per the CBP’s website, international mail is screened thusly:

Mail entering the United States from abroad first arrives at a United States Postal Service (USPS) Sorting Facility. The Postal Service then sends packages to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for examination and to assess duties and taxes, if any is owed. CBP processing is required for civilian parcels as well as those sent from overseas military postal facilities (APO/FPO). If CBP re-sealed a package due to examination, colored tape with the words “Examined by CBP” would be used.

Despite a recruiting crisis and agents being reassigned to the border — limiting resources needed to deal with identifying contraband at mail processing centers across the U.S. — CBP has said it is “committed to dedicating its resources to thwart illicit opioid supply chains and networks” and that “an effort is underway” to use advanced technologies such as pollen analysis to help detect fentanyl more efficiently.

How effective can mail inspections ever be?

The amount of fentanyl seized by CBP has been steadily increasing over the last few years: the agency seized almost 34 pounds from 50 incidents in the 2016 fiscal year, 96 pounds from 221 incidents in 2017 and more than 136 pounds from 455 incidents in 2018. But the agency appears to be straining under the sheer volume of mail the U.S. receives.

In 2017, Robert Perez, then an acting executive assistant commissioner at CBP, testified before Congress that, in the absence of advanced data to help target suspicious packages, officers were required to sort through large bags or bins of parcels manually. (Perez is now listed as deputy commissioner for the agency on their website.) “This manual process, again coupled with the tremendous volume of inbound mail to the United States, creates a daunting task for CBP,” Perez’s written testimony stated.

The 2018 Congressional investigation said that CPB’s manual efforts to inspect packages was “inefficient and the equivalent to finding a needle in a haystack.”

Lawmakers also noted in another 2018 congressional report about combatting the opioid epidemic that “few international mail packages are physically inspected by CBP” and on average, port officers employed by the CBP “only inspect 100 of the 1.3 million inbound international packages that USPS handles per day.”

In a statement to the Wall Street Journal following Trump’s tweets on Friday, a FedEx spokesperson said that “FedEx already has extensive security measures in place to prevent the use of our networks for illegal purposes… we follow the laws and regulations everywhere we do business and have a long history of close cooperation with authorities.”

Also via the WSJ, from a UPS spokesperson: “UPS takes a multilayered approach to security and compliance to identify and prevent delivery of illegal fentanyl and other illicit substances.”

Is it enough to go after the supply network?

“It’s critical that we work more closely with China, the main source for drugs like fentanyl that enter our country, to demand that they cut off the drug supply, while we work at home to stem demand,” Sen. Carper said during Congress’ investigation.

Leo Beletsky, a professor of law and health sciences at Northeastern University and an expert on opioids, says it’s the latter strategy that will make a difference. Trump’s remarks are a “knee-jerk statement,” Beletsky tells TIME, adding that it’s a “laughable proposition that we could stop the majority or even a major portion of contraband [even if] we triple the number of inspectors looking for the mail and delayed mail by multiple days.”

Trump’s statement is a reflection of U.S. drug policy more broadly, Beletsky notes — with a focus more on dismantling drug trafficking networks than helping vulnerable Americans struggling with substance abuse. Even if it were possible to do what Trump is proposing, it would not put a dent in fentanyl-related deaths, Beletsky says. He argues that the government should instead be directing money and resources into initiatives like expanding Medicaid, or prevention and rehabilitation programs which could work to make people less likely to become dependent on drugs in the first place.

“We’re much better served in trying to address demand for those substances and not turning to constantly play a cat-and-mouse game,” Beletsky says. “The evolution of fentanyl has been driven by efforts to crack down on the supply of heroin [and] encourages drug trafficking organizations to create ever more compact and less detectable drugs.”

The Trump administration has said it has made it curtailing opioid abuse a priority, including by reducing the over-prescription of opioids and increasing funding for opioid and pain research from $600 million to $1.1 billion.

New top story from Time: We Broke Down Every Second of the Mandalorian Trailer

Disney debuted the first trailer for its highly anticipated Star Wars TV show, The Mandalorian, during the D23 convention on Friday. The show will focus on a bounty hunter, played by Game of Thrones’ Pedro Pascal, operating at the outer edges of the galaxy between the events of Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens. The series will be available as soon as Disney’s forthcoming streaming service launches on Nov. 12.

The trailer teased shots of Pascal taking on Storm Troopers and a hint of someone frozen in carbonite, a la Han Solo. The series was created by Jon Favreau (who helmed Iron Man and Lion King) and boasts a famous cast that includes Giancarlo Esposito, Carl Weathers, Nick Nolte, Taika Waititi, Gina Carano and Werner Herzog.

Favreau compared the show to old Samurai movies or Westerns. “I pitched Kathleen Kennedy on a show that takes place after the Empire has fallen, and everybody is celebrating,” he said on the D23 stage. “Except there’s no central government, so everything falls into chaos.”

Here are the major takeaways followed by a thorough analysis of the Mandalorian trailer:

The Mandalorian is a bounty hunter

We don’t know much about Pascal’s character except that he is a bounty hunter that hails from Mandalor (the same planet as fan-favorite character Boba Fett, hence why their armor is similar). Much is made of that armor in the trailer: We never see Pascal’s face, but we do see him putting on armor we’ve come to associate with an amoral — if not outright villainous — character in Boba Fett.

Likely, the character will be an antihero or else a more morally ambiguous protagonist (somewhat like Han Solo, or at least the version of Han Solo who shot first).

It will be eight episodes and premiere on Nov. 12

Disney is hoping to attract the huge swath of Star Wars diehards to its streaming service with The Mandalorian. The show will premiere Nov. 12, the very first day that the streaming service launches.

LucasFilm head Kathleen Kennedy said at D23 that all the Star Wars TV series — including The Mandalorian, a series based on Rogue One hero Cassian Andor and a newly-announced Obi-Wan Kenobi showwill be just as high-quality as the Star Wars films, in terms of effects, scripts and cast and crew. The Mandalorian boasts many high profile directors, including Taika Waititi, Bryce Dallas Howard, Rick Famuyiwa and Deborah Chow.

It’s a new story, but with possible callbacks to the original films

Favreau emphasized during D23 that the show takes place during a time we have not seen on the big screen and focuses on characters we have not seen in the films. So don’t expect any Luke Skywalker cameos. As such, the show can be a gateway drug for newbies who don’t know much about Star Wars but can get caught up in the Wild-West version of its world.

But the geekiest of Star Wars fans shouldn’t fret: The trailer is full of easter eggs and callbacks to the Star Wars films. The trailer opens with a bunch of Storm Trooper helmets in a pile to indicate that the Empire has fallen. It also flashes to someone frozen in Carbonite, just like Han Solo was at the end of Empire Strikes Back.

We broke down every second of The Mandalorian trailer

Here’s what we gleaned from a close look at the Mandalorian trailer, moment by moment:

0:02 The Empire has definitely fallen. This show is set after Empire when Luke, Leia and Han defeat the Emperor and overthrow his government. These Stormtroopers either died or abandoned their armor on a sandy planet.

0:07 Yep. Those Stormtroopers are definitely dead. These are probably meant as a warning sign to Empire loyalists who try to enter this city’s walls. We see what we can assume is the titular Mandalorian walk by the spiked heads, seemingly indifferent. Again, he’s probably someone who is neither good nor evil and doesn’t care about the force.

Mandalorian trailer

0:17 We get a first look at the Mandalorian’s ship, the Razorcrest, flying over a bountiful planet.

0:21 The Mandalorian seems to operate across the galaxy. We can expect plenty of ship action and fights in the air. Here, he docks in a town that looks like it got caught in the crossfire between the Empire and the Rebel Alliance. That structure directly in front of the Mandalorian looks to be in ruins.

mandalorian trailer

0:27 Here is Carl Weathers as Greef Carga, a man we know works with the Mandalorian. He’s probably either offering him a job or paying him for one. They exchange something.

0:33 This seems like the type of TV series that fans are going to want to watch on their TVs rather than their laptops or phones: LucasFilm seems to have spent as much on effects to create gorgeous shots like these as they usually do on their films.

0:38 The Mandalorian puts on his armor. The armor is heavily emphasized in the footage and we never see the character’s full face. The message: He has no identity outside the armor.

mandalorian trailer

0:39 Gina Carano plays Cara Dune. We know that she fought with the Rebel Alliance to restore the Republic.

mandalorian trailer

0:40 This is a humanoid creature called an Ugnaught. They’re native to the planet Gentes, so it’s possible that’s where the Mandalorian is in this scene.

mandalorian trailer

0:41 This woman is a Twi’lek. (Bib Fortuna was the first Twi’lek to appear in the Star Wars films as one of Jabba the Hutt’s steward.)

mandalorian trailer

0:45 A scared woman holds a child while presumably in hiding. This scene is somewhat reminiscent of the beginning of Rogue One when a young Jyn Erso goes into hiding on a similar looking planet.

mandalorian trailer

0:46 A shot of Death Troopers, an elite group within the Stormtroopers known for their stealth. Apparently even though the Empire has fallen, they survive.

mandalorian trailer

0:49 Giancarlo Esposito confirmed during D23 that he plays someone who serves the Empire, which is currently in shambles after the fall of Palpatine. It’s unclear whether he answers to a new emperor or whether he has gone rogue with his own cohort of Stormtroopers in the absence of a real government.

mandalorian trailer

0:57 The Mandalorian on a swooper bike. This is the closest we get to seeing the Mandalorian’s actual face.

mandalorian trailer

1:00 There are lots of shots of fighting and chaos that we’re not including because the upshot is: Luke’s victory hasn’t exactly ushered in an age of peace in the galaxy. Ships are shooting other ships. Bad guys are attacking good guys. Children are crying. Here, the Mandalorian seems to have teamed up with a droid, likely the one voiced by Taika Waititi, IG-11.

mandalorian trailer

1:07 IG-11 is great at fighting! This shoot-out looks to be taking place on the wartorn planet where the Mandalorian landed his ship earlier in the trailer.

1:06 The Mandalorian is outnumbered against four Stromtroopers but doesn’t seem worried about it.

1:15 It’s difficult to tell from this screenshot, but the Mandalorian uses a grappling hook to trip this guy he’s fighting. Here, he has just shot the buttons next to this door such that the door shuts on this person and cuts him in half. It’s a move that elicited a visceral “oof” from the crowd at D23 and felt like a very Star Wars action moment. Werner Herzog’s character intones at this point: “Bounty hunting is a complicated profession.” No kidding.

1:18 Han Solo isn’t the only man or creature who has ever been frozen in Carbonite. Here we see an alien suffering a similar fate.

mandalorian trailer

1:19 Werner Herzog’s character continues his monologue from before: “Don’t you agree?” We don’t yet know the character that Herzog is playing, but it’s Werner freakin’ Herzog, so it’ll probably be great.

New story in Politics from Time: On Campaign Trail, Joe Biden Asks: What if Obama Had Been Assassinated?

(CROYDON, N.H.) — Joe Biden pondered a most serious, and awkward, question at a campaign stop Friday: What if Barack Obama had been assassinated during his presidential campaign in 2008?

Toward the end of an event in Hanover, Biden evoked two of his political heroes, Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy. Both were assassinated in 1968, Kennedy while running for president. “Imagine what would have happened if, God forbid, Barack Obama had been assassinated after becoming the de facto nominee?” Biden then said. “What would have happened in America?”

The 76-year-old Biden served as Obama’s vice president for two terms and was a U.S. senator representing Delaware for 36 years. He is seeking the Democratic nomination for president for a third time after two failed runs in 1988 and 2008 cycles.

Biden has long been prone to gaffes and misspeaking, another aspect of his candidacy that has come under scrutiny during his latest presidential run.

Biden’s two appearances Friday included several other problematic comments as he riffed to the crowd. As he talked about teachers, he referenced his wife, Jill Biden, an educator, saying that if he didn’t support teachers, “I would be sleeping alone.”

At his final event of the day as he talked about taking away some tax breaks for richer Americans, Biden said, “I find most rich people are as patriotic as poor people.”