New top story from Time: A New York Doctor Who Died After Fever and Cough Was Never Tested for Coronavirus, Highlighting the Limits of the Official Toll

(NEW YORK) — As the coronavirus bore down on New York, Dr. Doug Bass’ family begged him to work from home. He refused, pointing to his patients at Phoenix House, a drug and alcohol treatment center where he served as medical director.

“He said he was on the front lines and they needed him,” his brother, Jonathan Bass, told The Associated Press. “Too many people relied on him.”

Bass, 64, died suddenly last month after suffering symptoms commonly caused by coronavirus, including coughing, a fever and severe stomach cramping. That made him possibly the first physician still treating patients in New York City to die from the disease caused by the coronavirus.

Except he wasn’t counted.

It happened so quickly he was never tested for COVID-19, but his brother believes he was among the hundreds of undiagnosed cases that, for weeks, have been excluded from the official coronavirus death toll.

Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday the city would begin counting victims like Bass who weren’t tested, including those dying at home whose symptoms fit certain parameters.

“It’s just horrendous. The numbers speak for themselves. This used to be a very, very rare thing in New York City and suddenly it’s jumped up. The only thing that’s changed is COVID- 19,” de Blasio told reporters.

A year ago, the New York City Fire Department was receiving an average of 64 calls for cardiac arrest per day, generally with no more than half of those patients dying, FDNY spokesman James Long said. “Now, in this pandemic, we are seeing more than 300 cardiac arrest calls each day, with well over 200 people dying each day,” Long wrote in an email.

Casualties have been undercounted worldwide, experts say, due not only to limits in testing but the different ways nations count the dead — not to mention deliberate underreporting by some governments.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued new guidance saying it is acceptable to count undiagnosed COVID-19 cases as “probable” or “presumed” coronavirus deaths under circumstances that are “compelling within a reasonable degree of certainty.”

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday said he was also interested in trying to find a way to account for people who die at home without being tested.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. But for others, especially older adults and people with health problems, it can cause pneumonia.

Bass, the New York City doctor, believed he had been getting better in the days before his death and continued working for Phoenix House, which provides residential and outpatient treatment at multiple locations in New York City and Long Island.

He had a weakened immune system, his brother said, but “nothing life-threatening and nothing terminal.” He collapsed in the elevator of his building in Manhattan’s East Village neighborhood after calling for an ambulance because he could not breathe. Officials at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, the hospital where Bass was taken, declined to comment on his death.

Ann-Marie Foster, the president and chief executive officer of Phoenix House, said her organization had at least two patients who had tested positive for coronavirus, but added it was not clear whether Bass had dealings with them. She said she received an email from Bass at 6:27 p.m. on March 27, the evening before his death.

“We’ve lost a gem,” she said.

There have been similar uncounted fatalities among health care workers.

An emergency room physician at East Orange General Hospital outside Newark, Frank Gabrin, died March 31 from what his loved ones and colleagues described as coronavirus complications. A cancer survivor who also was never tested for COVID-19, Gabrin died in his husband’s arms, at home in New York City, days after developing symptoms that included a dry cough, aches and fever.

The actual coronavirus death toll will be better understood when the pandemic is finally over, based on an a review of fatalities in out-of-hospital settings, said Dr. Mitchell Katz, president and chief executive officer of NYC Health + Hospitals, the largest municipal health system in the country.

“If an older person was found dead in their home, it would not be easy to know whether they succumbed to COVID without ever having been brought to diagnosis, or whether they succumbed to cardiac arrest,” Katz told reporters recently.

“I think there will be ways, when all of this horror that we’re living through is done, to try to study these things,” he added. “But I think, right now, everybody is in the moment trying to save as many lives as they can.”

___

Associated Press writers Michael R. Sisak in New York and David Porter in Newark, New Jersey, contributed to this report

New top story from Time: Presidential Betting in West Virginia Gets Shut Down After Only a Few Hours

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — For just a moment, West Virginia was the only state in the country to allow betting on the presidential election.

The short-lived play by bookmaker giant FanDuel, which was approved by the state lottery board, was announced and then quickly nixed Tuesday night in a bizarre sequence that appeared to baffle top government officials.

“I thought, you know, are you kidding me? The first thing that came to my mind was, you know, what next?” Republican Gov. Jim Justice said Wednesday. “It’s humorous but it’s ridiculous.”

FanDuel, which had President Donald Trump as a slight favorite over Democrat Joe Biden, said it took just one bet in the roughly hourlong window where wagers were accepted, though it wouldn’t say who it was for or how much was involved.

The company said it would have been fielding bets online and, eventually, allowed wagering at The Greenbrier resort, a lavish hotel owned by Justice where FanDuel operates. The governor said he was not aware of the deal until after it was announced.

The company issued a second statement about two hours after its initial announcement, saying “while the markets were approved, the West Virginia Lottery has asked FanDuel to refrain from offering the markets until they have time to fully work through the implications of this new market offering.”

The state’s top election official moved to shut things down quickly.

“Gambling on elections has been illegal in West Virginia since 1868,” Secretary of State Mac Warner said in a statement. “Gambling on the outcome of an election has no place in our American democracy. Not today. Not tomorrow. Not ever. This is a terrible idea. Let’s shut this down right now and be very clear about it.”

FanDuel was also offering bets on who would get the Democratic presidential and vice presidential nominations, which political party would win and on which party would win each state.

West Virginia Lottery Director John Myers issued a statement Wednesday evening saying his office “screwed up.”

“I thought it would be okay, but after review, it was clearly a mistake,” he said. “We just screwed up. I didn’t have the authority to do it, it should have never happened and I apologize to everyone.”

___

Associated Press writer Wayne Parry in Atlantic City, N.J., contributed to this report.

New top story from Time: Presidential Betting in West Virginia Gets Shut Down After Only a Few Hours

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — For just a moment, West Virginia was the only state in the country to allow betting on the presidential election.

The short-lived play by bookmaker giant FanDuel, which was approved by the state lottery board, was announced and then quickly nixed Tuesday night in a bizarre sequence that appeared to baffle top government officials.

“I thought, you know, are you kidding me? The first thing that came to my mind was, you know, what next?” Republican Gov. Jim Justice said Wednesday. “It’s humorous but it’s ridiculous.”

FanDuel, which had President Donald Trump as a slight favorite over Democrat Joe Biden, said it took just one bet in the roughly hourlong window where wagers were accepted, though it wouldn’t say who it was for or how much was involved.

The company said it would have been fielding bets online and, eventually, allowed wagering at The Greenbrier resort, a lavish hotel owned by Justice where FanDuel operates. The governor said he was not aware of the deal until after it was announced.

The company issued a second statement about two hours after its initial announcement, saying “while the markets were approved, the West Virginia Lottery has asked FanDuel to refrain from offering the markets until they have time to fully work through the implications of this new market offering.”

The state’s top election official moved to shut things down quickly.

“Gambling on elections has been illegal in West Virginia since 1868,” Secretary of State Mac Warner said in a statement. “Gambling on the outcome of an election has no place in our American democracy. Not today. Not tomorrow. Not ever. This is a terrible idea. Let’s shut this down right now and be very clear about it.”

FanDuel was also offering bets on who would get the Democratic presidential and vice presidential nominations, which political party would win and on which party would win each state.

West Virginia Lottery Director John Myers issued a statement Wednesday evening saying his office “screwed up.”

“I thought it would be okay, but after review, it was clearly a mistake,” he said. “We just screwed up. I didn’t have the authority to do it, it should have never happened and I apologize to everyone.”

___

Associated Press writer Wayne Parry in Atlantic City, N.J., contributed to this report.

New top story from Time: An Yu’s Braised Pork Is an Engrossing Portrait of Isolation

A young woman walks into the bathroom of her luxurious Beijing apartment with a scarf hugging each shoulder. She plans to ask her husband which he’d prefer she bring on their upcoming vacation, but notices he’s facedown in their bathtub. Jokingly, she asks him if he’s trying to wash his hair. No answer. She quickly realizes he’s not moving and takes his pulse—but he doesn’t have one. He’s dead.

These first pages of An Yu’s eerie debut novel, Braised Pork, sound like the beginning of a domestic thriller. There’s the dead husband. A fancy apartment. And a wife who reveals that even though she’s shocked by the unexpected death, she wasn’t happy with her marriage to begin with. Yu writes, “He had betrayed her. Abandoned her. Failed to honour the one thing he had promised her.”

But then, as she waits for the ambulance, Jia Jia, the story’s privately frustrated protagonist, discovers a sketch of a strange fish-man on a piece of paper left near her bathroom sink. She remembers her husband describing the creature on a trip he took to Tibet—it had shown up in a dream. Jia Jia doesn’t know it yet, but the drawing will take her miles from home, changing what she knows to be true about herself. It’s this experience that transforms Braised Pork into an original and electric narrative—one that doesn’t fit neatly into any genre.

As Jia Jia picks up the pieces of her life, she wonders how much of herself she suppressed to make her husband happy. She was once an artist, but her husband discouraged her from pursuing the passion professionally. Now she can explore those desires, though it means she’ll be doing so alone. The isolation Jia Jia feels in widowhood clearly isn’t new, and is made palpable through Yu’s detached, dreamlike prose. While sitting at a restaurant by herself, Jia Jia watches a couple nearby as they talk, then look at their food. “Head down, eyes closed, she listened to their silence and yearned for it to be hers,” Yu writes.

Another author might have chosen to follow a young widow on a journey of finding love after loss. But 28-year-old Yu, who was born and raised in Beijing, smartly decides not to. Instead, she uses 30-something Jia Jia as a way to explore the tensions of contemporary womanhood. Though Jia Jia does want to find love again, that’s only a small part of the story; Yu isn’t afraid to depict loneliness as a state of being that doesn’t need to be solved or changed. As she pivots away from her protagonist’s romantic endeavors, Yu leaves room for her to embark on a more material quest: uncovering the meaning behind the sketch she found next to her husband’s corpse.

The drawing of the slithery, perplexing figure haunts the character. Yu’s language is sparse yet surreal as she captures Jia Jia’s growing compulsion to learn of the sketch’s origins, which leads her on a trip to Tibet. There, she’s pushed to contemplate why she feels so connected with such a bizarre picture—one that reminds her of the person she is constantly trying to forget.

There are some images that make us so uncomfortable, it’s impossible to look away from them. For Jia Jia, it’s initially the fish-man, but then she gets stuck on more memories of the past, which interrupt her present. In Braised Pork, Yu raises provocative questions about why we get fixated on those moments—and how they might relate to the company we crave.

New top story from Time: Linda Tripp, Whose Tapes Exposed Clinton Scandal, Dies at 70

WASHINGTON — Linda Tripp, whose secretly recorded conversations with White House intern Monica Lewinsky led to the 1998 impeachment of President Bill Clinton, died Wednesday at age 70.

Her death was confirmed by attorney Joseph Murtha. He provided no further details.

In August 1994, Tripp became a public affairs specialist at the Pentagon, where Lewinsky worked after being a White House intern. The two reportedly became friends.

Tripp made secret tapes of conversations with Lewinsky, who told her she had had an affair with Clinton. Tripp turned almost 20 hours of tapes over to Kenneth Starr, the independent prosecutor investigating the president, prompting the investigation that led to his impeachment.

As news broke Wednesday that Tripp was near death, Lewinsky tweeted that she hoped for her recovery “no matter the past.”

New story in Technology from Time: ‘We Learned a Lesson.’ Zoom’s CEO Wants You to Trust the Company Again

As businesses, schools and other organizations were forced to quickly, and sometimes haphazardly, move their operations online amid the COVID-19 pandemic, they embraced a number of tools making that shift possible. Among them: Zoom, a video conferencing service that’s seen a huge increase in usage by everyone from teachers to coworkers to friends looking to host group hangouts with one another. Zoom had 10 million customers at the end of 2019, three months later it finds itself with 200 million — not to mention a stock price that’s up nearly 80% on the year in an otherwise largely catastrophic market.

Growth being the name of the game in Silicon Valley, almost any tech giant would gladly welcome that kind of meteoric rise. But along with the overnight popularity came increased scrutiny. Privacy experts have sounded all sorts of alarms about Zoom, ranging from the rise of “Zoombombing,” or the practice of uninvited interlopers invading chats, to a deadly serious flaw that reportedly allowed hackers to take over a victim’s webcam and microphone. Some have raised concerns about the company’s ties to China, a country with little respect for privacy rights. Motherboard reported that Zoom was sending information to Facebook via the social network’s analytics tools. The New York Times found the company was linking users who wanted to remain anonymous to their LinkedIn profile. Wired looked into questions about Zoom’s end-to-end encryption, a technology meant to keep chats hidden from prying eyes and ears.

All this attention has put Zoom CEO Eric S. Yuan on the defensive. In an interview with TIME, the 50-year-old chief executive was candid about the company’s issues in handing the sudden demand. He argues that Zoom was always meant as an enterprise product — meaning a service for businesses, not personal users — and thus wasn’t designed with personal privacy top of mind. But he also understands that the company needs to reevaluate its priorities to meet this unusual moment.

“We’re learning that, when it comes to enterprise users or otherwise, privacy is very important,” Yuan tells TIME. “Some features might work well for enterprise customers and may not work for consumers. You’ve got to have balance.”

Yuan, who left China in the 90’s to join the engineering team at WebEx (which in 2007 was acquired by Cisco Systems, where he became Corporate VP of Engineering), says that Zoom has quickly worked to address privacy issues and other problems.

“Overnight, we signed on so many users, we tripled our capacity, offered K-12 schools free services, it was very exciting,” Yuan says. “But we needed to train [users], because quite often they do not have I.T. resources. We needed to change some security settings, like password enforcement on day one. But we learned a lesson, we quickly made a change.”

Indeed, Zoom is taking what some privacy experts say are commendable efforts to address its issues. It recently announced a 90-day plan to focus on privacy rather than flashy new features, as well as brought on Alex Stamos, a well-respected privacy expert who was formerly Facebook’s chief security officer, as an outside advisor.

Gennie Gebhart, Associate Director at pro-privacy nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), says such moves are welcome after what she describes as years of the slow erosion of people’s right to privacy.

“More and more of our daily lives are being mediated by third parties, and we’ve been living in that moment for decades,” says Gebhart. “But third parties often don’t have your privacy and your right to be left alone as their first interest. We’re seeing this totally new violation of that right to be left alone in increasingly intimate settings that I don’t think Zoom was made for originally, but that it’s now trying to step up to.”

Some of the issues people have had with Zoom can be fixed with more careful use. Zoombombing, for instance, can largely be prevented if users follow the company’s recommended practices. The company has addressed many of the aforementioned problems, too — that webcam and microphone flaw was quickly fixed, and Zoom has gotten rid of the offending Facebook and LinkedIn ties. But the company’s reputation is already suffering. New York City’s Department of Education, for instance, recently advised teachers to drop Zoom “as soon as possible,” citing security concerns.

For a company like Zoom, education is a particularly tricky minefield to navigate. Minors have privacy protections that adults do not, thanks to laws like the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). When teachers suddenly had to scramble to get their classrooms online as schools shut down, many choose Zoom as an ad-hoc remote learning platform, sometimes without the involvement of a professional I.T. team. Now that the dust has settled, some educators are reevaluating whether Zoom was the right choice.

“Teachers will sign up for a free basic account, and that’s not actually compliant,” says Nathan McNulty, an education security expert who works in Oregon. “I think that’s what New York City schools are trying to rein in. It’s a mess, it’s a big mess.” He says that schools and teachers weren’t able to properly vet services like Zoom before they were expected to move their classrooms online. “They’re not just going to hop into Google and search ‘Zoom best security practices,’ right?,” says McNulty. “You need an I.T. person who knows that’s an issue, because you don’t know how much you don’t know.”

McNulty says that, for educators already on Zoom, moving to something else now could be more trouble than it’s worth. “I would still recommend Zoom, at least if you’re already on it,” he says. “To say, ‘oh sorry, you can’t see your class because we’re setting up something new,’ I feel for the impact that this is having on the kids. I just want them to be able to connect, because the human side is more important than just making sure everything has perfect security and perfect privacy,” he says. “But that’s not a very popular opinion in information security.”

Other experts say Zoom and other similar services need to embrace “privacy-by-default,” or the idea that services should be built for privacy from the ground up. “No one should need a computer science degree, or a law degree, or have their weekends free to work on the new project of protecting their privacy from all these enemies they’ve heard of and even more they’ve never heard of,” says Gebhart, from the EFF. “That’s not a sustainable solution, and we need sustainable solutions. We’re settling in for a marathon.”

For Yuan, while the sudden growth has certainly been exciting, he’s eager to get out of the spotlight and back to focusing on enterprise customers.

I don’t think we know how to play in the consumer market, but we do know how to focus on privacy and security,” he says. “It doesn’t mean we want to be in the consumer market. This is a crisis, we want to help. After it’s over, we want to go back to serving our existing enterprise customers.” But given how long we may find ourselves social distancing, Zoom may be in the consumer business for some time.

New top story from Time: ‘We Learned a Lesson.’ Zoom’s CEO Wants You to Trust the Company Again

As businesses, schools and other organizations were forced to quickly, and sometimes haphazardly, move their operations online amid the COVID-19 pandemic, they embraced a number of tools making that shift possible. Among them: Zoom, a video conferencing service that’s seen a huge increase in usage by everyone from teachers to coworkers to friends looking to host group hangouts with one another. Zoom had 10 million customers at the end of 2019, three months later it finds itself with 200 million — not to mention a stock price that’s up nearly 80% on the year in an otherwise largely catastrophic market.

Growth being the name of the game in Silicon Valley, almost any tech giant would gladly welcome that kind of meteoric rise. But along with the overnight popularity came increased scrutiny. Privacy experts have sounded all sorts of alarms about Zoom, ranging from the rise of “Zoombombing,” or the practice of uninvited interlopers invading chats, to a deadly serious flaw that reportedly allowed hackers to take over a victim’s webcam and microphone. Some have raised concerns about the company’s ties to China, a country with little respect for privacy rights. Motherboard reported that Zoom was sending information to Facebook via the social network’s analytics tools. The New York Times found the company was linking users who wanted to remain anonymous to their LinkedIn profile. Wired looked into questions about Zoom’s end-to-end encryption, a technology meant to keep chats hidden from prying eyes and ears.

All this attention has put Zoom CEO Eric S. Yuan on the defensive. In an interview with TIME, the 50-year-old chief executive was candid about the company’s issues in handing the sudden demand. He argues that Zoom was always meant as an enterprise product — meaning a service for businesses, not personal users — and thus wasn’t designed with personal privacy top of mind. But he also understands that the company needs to reevaluate its priorities to meet this unusual moment.

“We’re learning that, when it comes to enterprise users or otherwise, privacy is very important,” Yuan tells TIME. “Some features might work well for enterprise customers and may not work for consumers. You’ve got to have balance.”

Yuan, who left China in the 90’s to join the engineering team at WebEx (which in 2007 was acquired by Cisco Systems, where he became Corporate VP of Engineering), says that Zoom has quickly worked to address privacy issues and other problems.

“Overnight, we signed on so many users, we tripled our capacity, offered K-12 schools free services, it was very exciting,” Yuan says. “But we needed to train [users], because quite often they do not have I.T. resources. We needed to change some security settings, like password enforcement on day one. But we learned a lesson, we quickly made a change.”

Indeed, Zoom is taking what some privacy experts say are commendable efforts to address its issues. It recently announced a 90-day plan to focus on privacy rather than flashy new features, as well as brought on Alex Stamos, a well-respected privacy expert who was formerly Facebook’s chief security officer, as an outside advisor.

Gennie Gebhart, Associate Director at pro-privacy nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), says such moves are welcome after what she describes as years of the slow erosion of people’s right to privacy.

“More and more of our daily lives are being mediated by third parties, and we’ve been living in that moment for decades,” says Gebhart. “But third parties often don’t have your privacy and your right to be left alone as their first interest. We’re seeing this totally new violation of that right to be left alone in increasingly intimate settings that I don’t think Zoom was made for originally, but that it’s now trying to step up to.”

Some of the issues people have had with Zoom can be fixed with more careful use. Zoombombing, for instance, can largely be prevented if users follow the company’s recommended practices. The company has addressed many of the aforementioned problems, too — that webcam and microphone flaw was quickly fixed, and Zoom has gotten rid of the offending Facebook and LinkedIn ties. But the company’s reputation is already suffering. New York City’s Department of Education, for instance, recently advised teachers to drop Zoom “as soon as possible,” citing security concerns.

For a company like Zoom, education is a particularly tricky minefield to navigate. Minors have privacy protections that adults do not, thanks to laws like the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). When teachers suddenly had to scramble to get their classrooms online as schools shut down, many choose Zoom as an ad-hoc remote learning platform, sometimes without the involvement of a professional I.T. team. Now that the dust has settled, some educators are reevaluating whether Zoom was the right choice.

“Teachers will sign up for a free basic account, and that’s not actually compliant,” says Nathan McNulty, an education security expert who works in Oregon. “I think that’s what New York City schools are trying to rein in. It’s a mess, it’s a big mess.” He says that schools and teachers weren’t able to properly vet services like Zoom before they were expected to move their classrooms online. “They’re not just going to hop into Google and search ‘Zoom best security practices,’ right?,” says McNulty. “You need an I.T. person who knows that’s an issue, because you don’t know how much you don’t know.”

McNulty says that, for educators already on Zoom, moving to something else now could be more trouble than it’s worth. “I would still recommend Zoom, at least if you’re already on it,” he says. “To say, ‘oh sorry, you can’t see your class because we’re setting up something new,’ I feel for the impact that this is having on the kids. I just want them to be able to connect, because the human side is more important than just making sure everything has perfect security and perfect privacy,” he says. “But that’s not a very popular opinion in information security.”

Other experts say Zoom and other similar services need to embrace “privacy-by-default,” or the idea that services should be built for privacy from the ground up. “No one should need a computer science degree, or a law degree, or have their weekends free to work on the new project of protecting their privacy from all these enemies they’ve heard of and even more they’ve never heard of,” says Gebhart, from the EFF. “That’s not a sustainable solution, and we need sustainable solutions. We’re settling in for a marathon.”

For Yuan, while the sudden growth has certainly been exciting, he’s eager to get out of the spotlight and back to focusing on enterprise customers.

I don’t think we know how to play in the consumer market, but we do know how to focus on privacy and security,” he says. “It doesn’t mean we want to be in the consumer market. This is a crisis, we want to help. After it’s over, we want to go back to serving our existing enterprise customers.” But given how long we may find ourselves social distancing, Zoom may be in the consumer business for some time.